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We Buy Houses in Wyandotte

We buy houses in Wyandotte Michigan

WE BUY HOUSES IN WYANDOTTE, MI


We buy houses in Wyandotte  for 100% cash. We work hard to fund our offers as quickly as possible. You also get to choose your own move out date. Do you have an Wyandotte, Michigan home with tenants? We buy any home in Wyandotte. If you have nightmare tenants, problems with your foundation, or other damage, we are always happy to provide you with a fair all cash offer on your house.

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We buy houses in ANY CONDITION in Michigan. We offer no fees, no commissions and no obligation. Start by providing some info about your property.


We Buy Houses in Wyandotte

We offer 100% cash for your Michigan home. Our offers are funded quickly. Choose your own move out date. Do you have a Wyandotte, MI home that has tenants? We buy any home in Wyandotte! Cracked foundation? Deferred repairs? No problem! We would love to make you a cash offer on your property.

Sell Your Wyandotte, MI House For Cash!

Sell my house fast for cash - 4 easy stepsAre you looking to sell your home in Wyandotte, but you need cash right now? Well, we have got you covered. It doesn’t matter what condition it is. We pay cash for houses in any condition! The excellent news for homeowners is that we can give you a fair all-cash proposal. Selling your house for cash is the best option for sellers who have unwanted properties. It doesn’t matter the condition of your home. We buy houses in Wyandotte, Michigan.

  • Does your house have water or fire damage? We’ll buy it.
  • Don’t want to go through the time-consuming hassle of selling your home? We have the cash for your house, right now.
  • Are you avoiding foreclosure? We’ll buy your house so you can get to a better life.
  • Are you facing a divorce and need to rid your property? We’ll take care of you, no questions asked.
  • Are you merely moving to a new place, but your current house is still a big question? We’ll take it, and give cash so you can move right away.
  • Are you dealing with a tax lien? You may not want that property, but we certainly do. Sell it to us!

We’ve helped countless Wyandotte Michigan homeowners with several of these issues you may be facing now, and we’ve made them richer for it. Has your home been vacant for years, is uninhabitable, or there is significant damage? We’ll offer you a fair proposal for your house in cash. If you’ve ever inherited an unwanted home, fallen behind on your mortgage, have liens that you owe, or otherwise can’t sell your house yourself, you should talk to us. Even fire damage or previous nightmare tenants won’t get in your way when you are ready to sell to us. So get some cash in your hands today, and contact us now.

We are very sensitive to your needs too. Sometimes you need to sell a home because of unfavorable circumstances. If there was a death in your family, a terrible divorce, or a horrible foreclosure, we can help you. If your house turned your life upside down, contact us to get the cash you need to put your situation behind you. In other cases, property owners simply don’t have the time to do the things required to sell their houses properly. And we agree, selling a home on the market is a daunting task that consumes a lot of time. If this is something that describes what your situation is currently, we’ll give you cash fast.

Our team is entrusted to give you a fair rate for your house as soon as they meet you in-person or on the phone. If you need to sell your home, nobody else in this market will take care of you better in such a short time. If you need a fast option to get cash for houses, We let you skip the stress involving your ugly home because we purchase houses as-is. We close as soon as possible so you can get your cash faster. It’s that easy. So enjoy the time and convenience of selling your house for cash today!

About Wyandotte, Michigan

Wyandotte MichiganWyandotte is a city in Wayne County in the U.S. state of Michigan. The population was 25,883 at the 2010 census, a decrease of 7.6% from 2000. Wyandotte is located in southeastern Michigan, approximately 11 miles south of Detroit on the Detroit River, and is part of the collection of communities known as Downriver.

History of Wyandotte Michigan

Founded as a village in 1854 (deeded by John Biddle to Eber Ward, et al. on December 12, 1854), Wyandotte was incorporated as a city, and granted a charter by the State of Michigan, on December 12, 1866, with the first city election held in April 1867, thus making it the oldest incorporated city in Wayne County other than Detroit. The site where Wyandotte sits today in the 18th century was a small village called by the native Indians “Maquaqua” and by the local French “Monguagon”. This Native American tribe was known as the Wyandot or Wendat, and were part of the Huron nation originally from the Georgian Bay area of Canada.

It was from near here, along the banks of Ecorse Creek, now a northern boundary of the present-day city, that Chief Pontiac plotted his failed attack against the British garrisoned Fort of Detroit, in 1763. The center of the village was nearly parallel to Biddle Avenue between Oak Street and Eureka Road near the river and its sandy beach, which was a welcome feature to the local tribesmen, as their main mode of transportation to the fort in Detroit was by birch bark canoe. The tribe was considered peaceable and friendly with the British, the remaining French in the area, and the newly arrived Americans.

They were a farming tribe and were therefore fairly stable in their settlement, relying heavily on hunting in the local surrounding hardwood forest, fishing from the river, and trading with the nearby fort and associated settlers to supplement their existence. Between Maquaqua/Wyandotte and Detroit (a distance of roughly 10 to 12 miles (16 to 19 km)) there were numerous settlers living along the river who inhabited their ancient “Ribbon Farms”, some dating back to the time of Antoine Cadillac’s founding of “Fort Pontchartrain du Détroit”, in July 1701.

In 1818, the Wyandot signed a treaty with the U.S. government relinquishing this land, some moving to an area near Flat Rock, Michigan, then to Ohio, Kansas and finally Oklahoma; however, most of the Native Americans who lived in what is now Wyandotte, moved across the Detroit River to Anderdon, Windsor, Ontario, where their descendants live still today. The name somewhat lives on as Wyandotte County, Kansas.

One of the first white settlers to come to Wyandotte in the years after the Native Americans left was John Biddle, a Pennsylvania-born former Army major who fought in the War of 1812 and later went on to a prolific political career, serving as mayor of Detroit, delegate from the Territory of Michigan in the U.S. Congress, president of the Michigan Central Railroad, member and later speaker of the Michigan House of Representatives and one-time candidate for Michigan Governor. West Jefferson Avenue, which begins in downtown Detroit and runs south to Berlin Township, becomes Biddle Avenue within Wyandotte city limits.

Biddle purchased a 2,200-acre (8.9 km2) plot near modern Biddle Avenue and Vinewood Avenue in 1835 and created a farm he called “The Wyandotte.” He sold the plot in 1854 to Eber Ward of the Eureka Iron Company for $44,000. In 1864, Captain Eber Brock Ward used a high-quality grade of iron ore (known as “Superior”) from the recently opened Marquette Range in the Upper Peninsula, and smelted it into the first Bessemer Steel commercially cast in America, using the patented Bessemer process. In 1865, the process created steel rails and allowed an explosion of iron-related businesses to open in the region. As a result, Detroit soon became a major center of iron production, especially for use in stoves. (Wyandotte was home to several companies as well, including the Regeant Stove Co.) It would be this technology that would give Henry Ford from nearby Dearborn the capabilities to create large amounts of steel for his automobile assembly lines.

John S. Van Alstyne, general manager for Eber Ward of both the Eureka Iron & Steel Works and the associated Wyandotte Rolling Mills, laid out the master plan for the city. This plan was frequently called the “Philadelphia Plan”, with streets laid out on a north–south and east–west grid. Streets running in the east–west direction were named after native plants and trees; the streets running north–south were simply numbered, increasing in value from the river westward. Van Alstyne was elected as the city’s first mayor in 1867. A street along Wyandotte’s Detroit River is named after him – on the site of the former iron works he managed, after it failed and was razed around 1904.

He would also go on to found the Wyandotte Savings Bank in 1871, which was housed in the main office building of the Eureka Iron Works (which still stands at the southwest corner of Biddle and Elm; though greatly remodeled, it remains the oldest building in the city today) for decades until it relocated into a new building at the northwest corner of Biddle and Eureka Road in 1981, where it remained until it was acquired in January 1989 by NBD Bancorp. After 1995, successors to NBD – First National Bank of Chicago, Bank One, and Chase Bank – continued to operate in the same building, sharing it with the Wyandotte City Hall, which relocated into that building from a nearby former department store building in late 2012, until closing this branch in 2019.

Eureka Iron Works prospered through the late 19th century but suffered a shortage of raw materials. It closed in 1892, but not before Wyandotte became a major hub in the chemical production industry, possible because of the many salt mines deep below the city.

A community named New Jerusalem consisting of immigrants from multiple nations was founded in the 1890s in what is now Wyandotte. It was incorporated as a village with the name of Glenwood in 1900. In 1901 a post office was established here with the name of Bacon since there was already a Glenwood post office in Wayne Township, Cass County, Michigan. Wyandotte annexed the community in 1905.

The community of Ford City was founded as a village in 1902. It was named for John B. Ford who ran the Michigan Alkali Company there. In 1922 it merged with Wyandotte.

Commuting in Wyandotte, Michigan

The typical American commute has been getting longer each year since 2010. The average one-way commute in Wyandotte takes 25.1 minutes. That’s shorter than the US average of 26.4 minutes.

How people in Wyandotte get to work:
– 87.8% drive their own car alone
– 6.8% carpool with others
– 1.3% work from home
– 0.6% take mass transit

Cash For Michigan Houses – About Us

We buy properties in the following Wayne County Cities: Allen ParkBellevilleDearborn HeightsDearbornDetroitEcorseFlat RockGarden CityGibraltarGrosse Pointe FarmsGrosse Pointe ParkGrosse Pointe ShoresGross Pointe WoodsGrosse PointeHamtramckHarper WoodsHighland ParkInksterLincoln ParkLivoniaMelvindaleNorthvillePlymouthRiver RougeRiverviewRockwoodRomulusSouthgateTaylorTrentonWayneWestlandWoodhavenBrownstownCantonHuron Charter TownshipRedfordVan BurenGrosse IleSumpter and Wyandotte

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Wyandotte, MI, USA